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Academic building features metal roof

Petersen Aluminum Corp. supplied 16-inch Tite- Loc Plus metal roof panels to cover the Biological Sciences building at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Ga., completed in 2013.

Petersen Aluminum Corp. supplied 16-inch Tite- Loc Plus metal roof panels to cover the Biological Sciences building at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Ga., completed in 2013. The three-story, 158,000-square-foot, LEED Goldcertified facility has two portions. The low-rise wing is horizontally clad with Petersen Aluminum's M-36 siding panels that were reverse rolled with the ribs in so a wider-looking, flat panel appearance is created. A one-story, double-wing component where field-collected samples and biology specimens are stored is attached to the three-story building. The three-story portion houses classrooms, instructional laboratories, research laboratories and offices.

Joseph League, principal at S/L/A/M Collaborative, the architecture firm for the project, says the functions needed to be separated because they have different mechanical requirements. "The labs and classrooms require 100 percent re-circulated air," he says. "The building has a lot of plenum space and an attic that accommodates large air handlers. The whole rationale for the way we designed the low-rise wing was to separate the expanse of mechanical systems but to treat it as a handsome yet utilitarian out-building."

More than 100,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum's PAC-CLAD material was utilized for metal roof panels and siding. Richter Contracting Co. Inc. installed approximately 65,000 square feet of 22-gauge Tite-Loc Plus panels in Slate Gray and Pierre Construction Group Inc. installed 30,000 square feet of M-36 siding panels in Charcoal and Silver.

Ken Wood, senior superintendent at Richter Contracting, says the job went well. "The only real challenge was getting the panels on the roof due to the limited accessibility of the site," he says. "We had to use a sky crane and lay the crates of panels horizontal to the pitch. Then we would manually spin each panel and carry it over and drop it down onto the roof slope. That made it a little cumbersome since everybody was tied off for safety."

Collins Westcott, project manager at Pierre Construction Group, says his company previously used Petersen Aluminum's products. "The job was relatively straight-forward," he says. "The [general contractor] put together a great team and did lots of front-end planning that really made the project go smoothly."

The Biological Sciences building is located on a major campus pedestrian way that goes through a wooded area. Other campus buildings have red brick and metal roofs. "Given its unique siting, the building is somewhat of a departure from the architectural language of the rest of the campus, although it was purposely designed to be compatible from a materials standpoint," League says.

Architect: S/L/A/M Collaborative, Atlanta

General contractor: Brasfield & Gorrie, Kennesaw, Ga.

Installers: Richter Contracting Co. Inc., Albany, Ga., and Pierre Construction Group Inc., Stone Mountain, Ga.

Supplier: Commercial Roofing Specialties, College Park, Ga.

Metal roof panels/siding: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill., www.pac-clad.com