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Ribs make grade on school roof

Approximately 30,000 square feet of Elk Grove Village, Ill.-based Petersen Aluminum Corp.'s PAC-CLAD metal roof panels was installed on Beverly Farms Elementary School in Potomac, Md.

Approximately 30,000 square feet of Elk Grove Village, Ill.-based Petersen Aluminum Corp.'s PAC-CLAD metal roof panels was installed on Beverly Farms Elementary School in Potomac, Md. Joshua Hill, project architect at Bethesda, Md.-based Muse Architects, says it was important to use a gabled roof, brick layering and simulated double-hung windows to help provide scale. "The metal standing seam application was certainly a key component versus a large, blank roof with asphalt shingles," he says. "The ribs of the metal roof give it nice texture."

The school's roof is clad with 27,200 square feet of Petersen Aluminum's 0.04 Snap-Clad Panels in Slate Gray and 2,400 square feet of 0.04 Flush Panels in Slate Gray.

Hill says installing a metal roof was determined early in the design process. "Initially, the school district was hesitant because of a previous bad experience," he says. "That's one reason we wanted to use a Petersen Aluminum PAC-CLAD roof because we've had very good experiences with it and we believe that if you specify a good quality metal roof, you'll be happy with it and you won't have any issues."

Orndorff & Spaid Inc. in Beltsville, Md., installed the roof. Rick Honaker, assistant vice president at Orndorff & Spaid, says the project turned out great. "It was relatively straightforward; although we did have a lot of squares to put down in a short amount of time," he says. "We had two to three crews working on the job. The 40-foot panels were somewhat steep and the installers were tied-off at all times."

Muse Architects participated in community input sessions for the new building and Hill says his company wanted to connect the school to the neighborhood so it would fit in. "We like working on difficult sites with active communities," he says. "This was a small existing site and we needed to increase the net square footage of the school by 50 percent. We really had to be careful with the site strategy and architecture in order to not make it look like a big building that didn't fit into the neighborhood."

The 94,000-square-foot Beverly Farms Elementary School utilizes a geothermal heating and cooling system, a green vegetative roof on the flat portions and other sustainable design and construction components. The project was part of Montgomery County Public Schools ongoing revitalization and expansion program, and is on track for LEED Gold certification.

Petersen Aluminum Corp., www.pac-clad.com