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Triangular panels shape museum model

The rear façade of the Museum of the Moving Image of the art, history, technique, and technology of film, television and digital media in New York City is comprised of a surface pattern of triangles with 1,067 thin aluminum panels mounted on the support structure with open joints so that every joint is a rain grate.

The rear façade of the Museum of the Moving Image of the art, history, technique, and technology of film, television and digital media in New York City is comprised of a surface pattern of triangles with 1,067 thin aluminum panels mounted on the support structure with open joints so that every joint is a rain grate.

MG McGrath fabricated and installed custom aluminum plate panels for the façade on a three-story addition, a 15,000-square-foot exterior clad with triangle-shaped aluminum plate wall panels with a contrasting 3-inch-deep reveal system and open joints in the panel system that vary in width and create larger triangle patterns within the façade.

The panels have a reflective, high-gloss, light blue finish that seems to blend in with the sky as it picks up the reflections of the clouds. The light blue panels look razor sharp and create the impression of a light, floating skin dematerialized against the sky, a visual cue in the architecture to the infinite thinness of the moving image. Additionally, the panels' pattern references lines in wireframe computer drawings.

The 200-foot-long rear façade, designed by Leeser Architecture, New York City, and completed in July 2013, is built to a 3/16-inch tolerance because the triangular panels fit together precisely to form the skin. F.J. Sciame Construction Co. Inc., New York City, was the general contractor.

MG McGrath Inc., www.mgmcgrath.com